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Adam's Needle, Beargrass, Curlyleaf Yucca, Spoonleaf Yucca

Yucca filamentosa

Leaves

Beargrass is easy to identify by its sharp, thick, evergreen leaves in a mounded basal rosette and the long, curly filaments on the leaf margins.

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Paynter, Wilmington, 4/30/2010

Common in dunes, woods and roadsides of the coast, piedmont and mountains. Note from Jack Spruill: "The leaves / blades of this plant are very strong. I remember when people who smoked herrings would use the split blades of beargrass to tie the herrings into small bundles to be hung in a smoke house. Even through suitable cord was widely available, it was the tradition to use split beargrass blades."

Coming into bloom

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Wilmington, May 2012

Flowers close up

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Inside the flower, 3-cleft stigma surrounded by stamens with pollen.

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Allegheny Onion

Allium allegheniense

Patch of Allegheny Onion

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Paynter, August 2011

Flowers

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In seed

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Paynter, September 2011




Allegheny Serviceberry, Juneberry, Shadbush

Amelanchier laevis

Max Patch

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Allegheny Spurge

Pachysandra procumbens

Old Leaves & New Bloom

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Tom Harville

Buds

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Tom Harville

Blooms

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Tom Harville
Mid March

Blooms Close Up

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Tom Harville
Mid March

Leaves Early Spring

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Tom Harville

Note that the mottling develops over the winter.

Leaves, Early Fall

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Tom Harville

New Leaves

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Pete Schubert
Early April '10

Note the one whitish leaf. There's no obvious explanation but we will watch it in years to come.




Alumroot

Heuchera americana

Blooming Plants in a Landscape

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Bloom Spikes

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Bloom close up

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Tom Harville

Typical leaves

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Atypical Leaves

Many selections have come from this species

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Tom Harville




American Elm, White Elm

Ulmus americana

Specimen tree of America Elm

Decimated by the Dutch Elm disease in the mid 1900s, American Elms are nonetheless common in North Carolina. "In our area, the effects of the disease appear to have been mild or nonexistent, especially in natural areas." (Weakley Flora) American Elm grows in swamps, bottomland forests, and open wet areas with rich soil.

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Charley Winterbauer, Wilmington, May 2011

Leaves

The leaves have an uneven base, toothed margins and come to a short point.

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Charley Winterbauer

Bark

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Charley Winterbauer




American Hazelnut

Corylus americana

Bloom

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Herb Amyx

Catkin

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Herb Amyx

Leaf

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Herb Amyx

Fruit

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Herb Amyx

Fruit close up

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Herb Amyx




American Holly, Christmas Holly

Ilex opaca

Male plant in bloom

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Jack Spruill, 4/28/09, Hampstead

From Jack Spruill - As with all the Ilex that I know, the male plants have many more flowers than do the females.

Female plant

Females must be near a male plant to set fruit. This one was 25' from the preceding male tree so it has a heavy berry set.

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Jack Spruill, 4/28/09, Hampstead

Fruits

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David Paynter, Wilmington, 2/1/2011

Bark of a mature tree.

The bark is normally gray and smooth. This one is unusually beautiful.

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Jack Spruill, 12/21/06, Hampstead

Bark on a very old tree.

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Jack Spruill, 6/29/09, Albemarle Sound

From Jack: Here is a very old Ilex opaca on my farm on the Albemarle Sound. This tree is very tall. I do not know if it is a male or female. Often I can tell the sex of the American Holly by examining its leaves. The leaves of a male tend to be smaller than the leaves of the female.




American ipecac, Midwestern Indian-physic

Gillenia stipulata (formerly Porteranthus stipulatus)

Upper leaflets

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Tom Harville

Lower Leaflets

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Tom Harville

Leaflet Differences

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Tom Harville

Buds

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Tom Harville

Blooms

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Tom Harville




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